How to Replace Damaged Window Screening

Occasionally, window screens meet the unhappy fate of unsightly tears and holes.  Replacing the damaged window screening rather than the entire screen can save you money.  The cost of the repair is minimal compared to the cost of a replacement.

Step by Step Instructions

  • Purchase any of the following items that you do not already have available- a roll of replacement screening, a screen rolling tool, rubber edging for screens, and a sharp razor knife.
  • Prepare a workspace that includes a surface area large enough to securely hold the screen frame.
  • Remove the window screen from the window.
  • The screen is probably secured to the frame with rubber edging.  Remove the edging to separate the screen from its frame.
  • Remove the entire piece of damaged screen.
  • Measure the size that you will need to replace the screen.  The replacement screening will be slightly larger than the damaged screening.  Measure to the edge of the screen and then add a bit more to the measurement.  This will allow you to have enough material to secure the screening to the screen frame.
  • Now, measure and cut the size that you need from the roll of replacement screening.  
  • Place the piece of replacement screening on the top of the screen frame.
  • Measure and cut the size that you need from the rubber edging, ensuring that there will be enough to fit all four sides of the screen.
  • Starting in a corner of the screen frame, use the screen rolling tool to firmly press the rubber edging into the groove of the screen frame while making sure that the screen is captured between the frame and the rubber edging.  Work slowly to avoid wrinkles or other complications.
  • Continue working until you have made your way completely around the screen.
  • Use a sharp razor knife to slowly and carefully trim away any excess screening material.
  • Place the screen frame back into the window.
  • Clean up the area by returning tools to their proper location, discarding any trash, and putting things back in place.

Pat Mulford • patmulford013@gmail.com

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